Gosport Station was designed in the 1840s by Sir William Tite, the renowned Victorian architect behind the third Royal Exchange in London. With its classic Italianate decor and Tuscan columns the station opened in 1841 and soon became an iconic feature of the town.

End of the line? Gosport's decline

Second World War bombing severely damaged the station, and in 1941 incendiary bombs destroyed almost the entire passenger side, including the enormous wooden roof. At the end of the war, the station was low on the list of priorities for repair and Gosport’s passenger service came to an end in June 1953.

The station was finally closed in 1969 as part of the ‘Beeching cuts’; the infamous reduction and restructure of the British railway network. By 1970 the station was deserted and the rail tracks lifted. Hampshire County Council purchased the site for development in 1973. Over the next 20 years various developments were considered, but none came to fruition.

In 2006 Re-Format Architects produced what would become an award-winning design for the restoration and conversion of Gosport.

A light at the end of the tunnel

In 2006 Re-Format Architects produced what would become an award-winning design for the restoration and conversion of Gosport.

We purchased the site for £1 and quickly began sub-contracting a number of local companies and tradespeople to complete the development, including four apprentices. After researching the iconic design of the station we replicated the timber sash windows and the stucco render used on the original buildings. We also carried out ecological work to relocate a badge sett and slow worms.

At a cost of £5.5 million the development was ready for people to move in in late 2010. The cost was funded by Guinness with the help of a grant from the Homes and Community Agency and English Heritage along with support from Gosport Borough Council. There are 35 homes, comprising apartments, houses and maisonettes for rent and shared ownership, as well as a community room and three business units.